2018 is the year TVs became really interesting again


For all the buzzwords surrounding television, I’ve felt like TVs have been kind of boring for a while. I’ve attended CES four years in a row, and it seemed each event basically refreshed the same basic units with only mildly tangible improvements.



For all the buzzwords surrounding television, I’ve feel like TVs have been kind of boring for a while. I’ve attended CES four years in a row, and it seemed each event basically refreshed the same basic units with only mildly tangible improvements. Sure, I’d ogle at the bombastic displays setups and panels I could never afford, but most improvements of the past years seemed more iterative than groundbreaking – or even just interesting. And then CES 2018 came along. This time around, the race wasn’t just on to see who could push more pixels, colors or nits – differences most consumers likely won’t even appreciate – but instead to make TVs more practical or unique.


Nvidia’s Big Format Gaming Displays

Monitors and TVs have spent most of their existence as disparate cousins, each with unique strengths. If you wanted a big screen and fancy tech like HDR (at least early on) you had to get a TV. If you wanted low input lag and high refresh rates, you had to get a monitor. But they’re just screens right? Why can’t we have it all? It’s a question I’ve been asking for years, and Nvidia is finally answering our prayers with its new BFGD’s. Essentially these combine the specs of a gaming monitor (120hz refresh rates, ultra low latency, G-Sync) with the spectacle of a TV (65-inch size, 4K HDR, Quantum Dots tech)


Author

Su Sonia Herring

Sonia is a mentor, researcher and editor. She works on numerous projects and internet governance initiatives including Youth IGF Turkey, Network of European Digital Youth and South East European Forum on Internet Governance.











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